Best Day Project New Paths

Best Day Project is a Suicide Prevention Project That Will Help You Keep Your Head Up

Enter to win your own Best Day and find resources for suicide prevention.

Grace Kim grew up in a community where being gay was unacceptable. At age 4 they already knew they didn’t fit within the gender binary (Kim uses gender-neutral pronouns), and the trauma led them to become selectively mute for almost 20 years. They were severely depressed and suicidal.

They decided that before they committed suicide they would have one amazing day. They spent that day in their hometown, San Francisco, riding the trolley cars and stopping in bookstores. By just being present and free to feel joy, something changed. It turned out that one good day in SF gave Grace a reason to live.

“There’s always hope if you’re alive,” Kim told Upworthy.


 

LGBTQIA youth are 4x more likely to commit suicide. Kim is dedicated to reducing this number and is giving youth the freedom and joy they might not know can exist, starting with the best day of their life. Their organization is called Best Day Project, fittingly, and it’s an LGBTQIA youth suicide prevention organization. Here you’ll find videos on the hundred things Kim committed to doing in 100 days on their journey to self-discovery, and you can enter to win your own best day of your life. You submit your biggest dream and you have a chance to win it.

Gaela Graciela Solo was the first to win the best day of their life from Kim.

“When I first met Grace I confided in her my secret: wanting to wear a long wedding gown with layers of tulle,” Solo told Upworthy. Her biggest wish was to throw a wedding for herself. That’s exactly what happened.

 

Gaela Graciela Solo's Best Day Project photo
Gaela Graciela Solo’s is one of several who was given their best day ever through the Best Day Project. Photo: Best Day Project / Facebook

 

100% of donations to the Best Day Project go towards giving someone the best day of their life. Or if you’re still waiting for the best day of your life, submit your dream and, who knows, maybe it’ll come true.

If you’re struggling with thoughts of suicide, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255.

New Paths

Explorer Club Celebrates 85 Years of Badass Lady Adventurers

Society of Women Geographers has been ignoring 'men only' nonsense for the better part of 100 years proving that curious, badass explorers have no time for gender rules.

At their first dinner, a woman showed up with a mummified South American Indian head – only a hint of the Earthly oddities the Society of Women Geographers chased.

The whole thing started when a group of well-traveled and sharp as hell women wanted in on the all-male Explorer’s Club, to which the men turned up their noses and said, “You’re not welcome here.”

Over tea, the women said “Fine, we’ll start our own girl gang then,” and in 1932 the Society came to be. The only prerequisite for joining: “Only women who have really done things.”

Amelia Earhart, Margaret Mead, and Jane Goodall all became members, and the society continues today. While they’ve put to rest the practice of exhibiting human remains at celebrations, they do continue to give inquisitive women a boost, offering fellowships to the best travelers and geographers who keep looking for the underbelly.

Born of oppression, these women spun and continue to spin straw into gold and this, we celebrate.

Rise Up

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